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Children’s Month at Easons this April!


There’s an exciting time ahead for kids at Eason with Children’s Month. There will be a 3 for 2 promotion across selected children’s books, games and puzzles and lots of events throughout the month from Story Time, Character costume tours, Graffiti wall challenge plus lots more. To find out the full range of events that will be happening in your local store see below:

Story Time Loyalty Promotion:
Throughout the Month of April, we are also offering any customers who purchase any of the titles for Story Time in the relevant week throughout April a bonus 25 loyalty points when they present their Thank You Card at the time of purchase. The list of books for which this applies is outlined below:

Dionosaur Rescue – Penny Dale
All I Said Was – Michael Morpurgo
Gruffalo – Julia Donaldson
Happy Birthday, Hugless Douglas – David Melling

 

 

 

Story Time Rewards Card:
Starting with Story Time on the 5th April, we are re-introducing the kids reward card at Saturday Story Times and this will run right through to the 31st August. Kids who receive Story Time will be given their own reward card and a sticker each week. Once they have collected 3 stickers they will receive a free selected kids book.

Character Costume Tour:
Throughout Children’s month a host of children’s costumes will go on tour around Eason stores. Here is the upcoming list of Costumes and their locations.

Horrid Henry Costume
Eason Blanchardstown – Tuesday 1st April
Eason Swords – Thursday 3rd April
Eason Donegall Place – Saturday 5th April

Hugless Douglas Costume
Eason Dundrum – Friday April 11th – 4pm
Eason O’Connell St – Saturday April 12th – 2pm
Eason Liffey Valley – Tuesday April 15th
Eason Galway – Friday 18th April / Saturday 19th April
Eason Limerick – Tuesday 22nd April
Eason Cork – Friday 25th April
Eason Mahon Point – Saturday 26th April
Eason Dungarvan – Tuesday 29th April

Gruffalo Costume
Eason Foyleside – Saturday 12th April 12
Eason Craigavon – Tuesday 15th April
Eason O’Connell St – Friday 18th April
Eason Blanchardstown – Saturday 19th April
Eason Dundrum – Tuesday 22nd April
Eason Swords – Thursday 24th April
Eason Donegall Place – Saturday 26th April

Tabletop Day!
Come join us in our Easonology department to celebrate Tabletop Day! Bring your friends or challenge one of our staff members to one of our many games for kids and adults! To find out more about Tabletopday visit www.tabletopday.com. A number of our stores will be hosting events and the dates and times for each are listed below.

• Saturday 5th April – Eason Patrick St. Cork – 9am – 6pm
• Saturday 5th April – Eason Donegall Place Belfast – 9am – 6pm
• Saturday 5th April – Eason Shop Street Galway – 9am – 5pm
• Saturday 5th April – Eason O’Connell St. Dublin – 8am – 7pm

View Eason Store Locator HERE >>

 

Eason ‘Mammyism’ Facebook Survey – Top 10 Results!

We asked our followers on Facebook to tell us what their most memorable ‘Mammyism’ was ahead of Mother’s Day this Sunday. Here is the top 10 results:

1. If you fall off that wall and break your legs, don’t come running to me!
2. Do you think I’m made of money?
3. Close the door! Were you born in a barn?
4. What part on ‘no’ don’t you understand?
5. How do you know you don’t like it if you haven’t tasted it?
6. A little birdy told me.
7. If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times.
8. Do you think this is a hotel?
9. Stop running down those stairs!
10. Are your hands broken? Pick it up yourself! I’m not your maid.

 

Irish authors tell us about their Mammies

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, we asked a number of Irish authors to tell us about their Mammies. Colm O’Regan, author of Irish Mammies, revealed that his mammy is angered when he doesn’t finish his dinner and always says “‘I. Hate. Wasting. Food.’ – with the full stops included!” When it comes to Irish mammies being unique, Colm adds that his mammy is a big fan of the hot press, “she has this obsession with airing clothes until they are drier than the Dead Sea Scrolls!”

Other renowned Irish authors also disclosed nostalgic anecdotes about their mothers and provide an insight into their childhoods. Benny Lewis revealed his mother has a sarcastic tone as she often says “I will in my eye”, while Zoe Miller’s mother’s favourite one-liner is the ever popular rhetorical question “close the door, were you born in a barn?” Cecelia Ahern acknowledges that her mom is a breath of fresh air and always used to say ‘well… on the other hand…’. Cecilia shares that her mam “always makes me see everybody else’s opinion which is refreshing… but annoying when I think I’m right!”

Fellow authors Claudia Carroll and Linda Kavanagh’s mams have the same frame of mind as both authors confess their mams had a habit of waiting up for them when they were having a night out. Linda expressed how her mam “waited up for me until the early hours… I’d come home and find her waiting in the kitchen!” Similarly, Claudia Carroll’s mother used to stand at the top of the stairs when she arrived home late, warning “I’ll deal with you in the morning!”

Eason’s Top 10 Greatest Mothers in Literature
To help mark the occasion of Mother’s Day, Maria Dickenson, Head Book Buyer at Eason, has shared their list of the Top 10 Greatest Mothers in Literature:

• Mammy Walsh from the Marian Keyes books
• Marmee from Little Women
• Bridget Jones in Mad About the Boy
• Mrs. Weasley from the Harry Potter series
• ‘Ma’ in Room
• Rose Brady in Amongst Women
• Miss Honey in Matilda
• Marilla Cuthbert in Anne of Green Gables
• Mrs Bennett in Pride & Prejudice
• Topaz in I Capture the Castle

Maria commented “Our list of Great Mothers from the world of books encompasses the many wonderful sides of mums. They are loving (Marmee), protective (Ma & Rose Brady), practical (Marilla), welcoming (Molly Weasley), creative (Topaz), hilarious (Mammy Walsh) and sometimes even a little bit pushy (Mrs Bennett) or a tad disorganised (Bridget Jones). And not all of them are birth mothers (Marilla, Topaz, Miss Honey), but they all love their charges with all their hearts and give them the best lives they can.”

Here is the full summary of the authors’ accounts of their Mothers.

Colm O’Regan – Author of Irish Mammies

1. What saying did your mother always use?
I. Hate. Wasting. Food. – full stops included.

I think it’s a theme that runs through generations of Irish parents, dipped for a bit during the Celtic Tiger but is back now. (Fortunately and unfortunately.)

2. What makes Irish mothers unique?
Irish Mammies are similar in many ways to mothers all over the world but there’s probably a certain combination of Living on an Island that’s stuck permanently in a draught, the everpresent possibility of rain, the twists and turns of Hiberno-English (Amn’t I right? Isn’t it true for me? That’s the why. Less of your smartness. Showmepeitinahtisonlyascratch,) the relatively strong connections between neighbours in most areas meaning knowing WHO DIED is very important, the dispersal of emigrants meaning the family needs a news hub. Combinations of some or all of these things.

And the obsession with airing clothes until they are drier than the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Not that I’d dare generalise of course :)

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you’ve ever done for your mother on Mother’s Day?
I’m not a big gestures type of person, preferring the more consistent low-level – sometimes imperceptibly so – thoughtfulness. This sounds like the excuse of someone who’s forgotten Mother’s Day. It’s not I swear. Oh wait, I can’t swear.

Benny Lewis – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
Well, the dead arose and appeared to many! [After sleeping in a bit]. I will in my eye! Come in now here ’till I take a look at ye.

Linda Kavanagh – Author

1. What saying did your mother always use?
My mother had two favourites: “Street angel, house devil” was applied to me or my brother when Mam maintained that we were being pleasant to outsiders but grumpy at home. Of course, we’d cheekily tell her that she was lucky we were so charming to others, and that we were simply proof of her brilliant parenting! Another favourite of Mam’s was “Live in hope, die in despair.” Being a Northerner, there was probably an element of Calvinism or fatalism about it, and she was merely expressing her view that all human endeavour was doomed anyway. Unfortunately, the expression has such a nice ring to it, that I find myself quoting her words to my own family now…

2. What makes Irish mothers unique?
When they wait up for you, until the early hours, in the belief that if you’re not home by midnight, like Cinderella, the world will suddenly turn into an evil place fraught with danger, in which you could be mugged, murdered or sold into slavery. My mother was convinced that even if I managed to avoid these misfortunes, once midnight had passed, I could still end up a raving alcoholic, drug-taker or worse. It was annoying to come home and find her waiting in the kitchen, her beady eyes checking me over, a look of both censure and relief on her face. (But now, with the benefit of hindsight, her concern seems quite endearing…)

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you’ve ever done for your mother on Mother’s Day?
It started out so well. I’d agreed with Dad that he’d take Mum out for the afternoon, and I’d bake her a surprise Mother’s Day cake. At sixteen, obviously I knew everything, so I was confident that I could produce a work of art in time for tea. Baking couldn’t be difficult, could it? All went well and the mixture went into the oven. And as I basked in the glow of a job well done, I chatted on the phone with a friend. In true teenage fashion, we talked at length about boys, homework, boys, the hateful nuns who taught us, boys… As the time passed and we chatted on, I suddenly detected a smell of burning coming from the kitchen. As I dropped the phone and rushed in, there was smoke billowing from the oven.The cake was burnt to a cinder. In my panic to clean up, I dropped the charred and burning remains on the new kitchen linoleum. When my parents arrived home, there was no cake, only a big black mark permanently burnt into the new kitchen floor. Eventually, my mother grudgingly saw the funny side of it, although it wasn’t the best of Mother’s Days for me… But ultimately, she got her value from the event, since she was able to remind me, every Mother’s Day from then on, about my ‘thoughtful’ gesture when I was sixteen….

Caroline Finnerty – Author

1. What saying did your mother always use?
Some of my mother’s favourite sayings: ‘That’s a grand ‘rigout’ you have on you there’ or ‘It is far from Cappuchinos/Levi jeans/Insert word as appropriate/ you were raised!’

2. What makes Irish mothers unique?
I think what makes Irish mammies so unique (and the best in the world) is that they constantly put everyone else’s needs before their own and their children will always be children in their eyes, even when they’re grown up with a family of their own.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you’ve ever done for your mother on Mother’s Day?
The most thoughtful thing I have done on mother’s day: I’m not sure if you can even describe is as thoughtful, but my first book ‘In a Moment’ was published around mother’s day in 2012. My author copies had arrived a few days before mother’s day and I was so excited that I wanted to drive straight over to my mother’s house and give her a copy of my very first published book but I held onto it and then surprised her with a copy on mother’s day. It was a very special moment to be able to thank her for all her love, support and encouragement over the years with a dedication inside my book.

Roisin Meaney – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
“All I need is patience”. With seven children, it got used a lot……

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
The wooden spoon – all seven of us were very familiar with it!

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
The week’s ironing. (We both hate it.)

Zoe Miller – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
‘Your health is your wealth!’ She guided five of us through the ups and downs of life and
this was her mantra, no matter what happened. She reminded us that nothing was
insurmountable, once we had good health and energy.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
The warm, solicitous way they fuss around you; wholesome food on the table and lots of it, tea and buttery scones, stoking the fire or upping the central heating dial to ensure warmth in the house, taking in your washing to give you a helping hand, wanting everyone to be happy… In my mother’s case, her delicious homemade apple tart, and the rich aroma of her Sunday lunch gravy is a legacy that none of us have been able to replicate.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
We’ve always celebrated the day with flowers, champagne and celebratory meals, but I think the Mother’s Day that meant the most to my mother was the year I bought her the first ever card. I was quite young, had just learned to read, and saw the Mother’s Day cards on display in our local newsagent. That was the first time I knew the day existed. I had just about enough pocket money to cover the cost of a card, and I surprised her with it on the day. Many years later, I came across the card tucked into a side pocket of her favourite handbag, worn and dog-eared, and it brought a big lump to my throat.

Emma Hannigan – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
Always have your running away money. If it’s there, chances are you won’t need it…

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
My mum was raised by an Austrian mother so most of our mothering notions stem from my grandmother. Her fail-safe fix-it-all remedy to first world problems was a cup of coffee with a slice of chocolate cake, followed by an hour’s rest in your bed. After that most issues seem to melt away…

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
The gesture that sticks out in my head was on Mother’s day in 2009. My first novel Designer Genes was released that weekend and I squirreled a copy away and presented it to Mum for the first time along with some flowers. I had dedicated the book to her and my dad. It was a really special and proud moment for us all. See, books really can change lives!!

Clodagh Murphy – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
My mother always said ‘Close the door, were you born in a barn?’, ‘Who’s “she”, the cat’s mother?’ (if you referred to someone in the third person while they were present) and ‘If my aunt had balls she’d be my uncle’ (as an antidote to wishful thinking). She also used to say ‘Where are you going with no bell on your bike and your knickers ringing?’, but we still have no idea what that meant.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
I think it would have to be the eyes in the back of their heads. That’s not normal.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
That would probably be the time I bought her a tin of mint humbugs. It doesn’t sound like much, but I was about five or six at the time and on a very low income, so it represented a significant sacrifice – even allowing for the fact that I was fond of mint humbugs myself …

Colette Caddle – Author

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
When she sent us to fetch something and we couldn’t find it her answer was ‘If it was chocolate you’d find it!’.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
Mothering right through life, no matter how old we get, they still worry about us
and cosset us. And no matter what we do wrong, they will see the best in us.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
I can’t remember any one thing but I have never bought chocolates or flowers. I always do something or buy something I know she wouldn’t do herself, eg, take her for a nice meal or buy her expensive makeup that she would never treat herself to.

Gemma Jackson – Author Happeny (Released in June 2014)

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
“You can eat in the street but you can’t sleep in the street.” My mother delivered these words of wisdom to every one of her children as we set forth to explore the world around us. I never forgot it. I sometimes went hungry on my travels but I always had a safe bed for the night.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
I think the ‘Irish’ welcome our mother’s give to our guests is second to none. It didn’t matter where the friends we brought home came from they were all welcome. There were times when our home resembled a youth hostel there were so many bodies parked around the floor in sleeping bags. The music and laughter rocked the house on its foundations from time to time but the demand for return invitations never faltered. I think the Irishwoman’s way of opening her home and her heart to her children and their friends is unique.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
One mother’s day I took my mother to Paris to see her grandson Joshua Jackson appearing in his first starring role. The Disney film Mighty Ducks was playing on the Champs Elysees. You should never try to impress an Irish mother. We came out of the cinema onto the world famous boulevard. I was thrilled with myself. I thought I’d come up with a really unique gift to show my appreciation of everything my mother had done for all of her children. My mother’s reaction, “It would have been a lot cheaper to go to the pictures in Dublin. We could have gone home after for a decent cup of tea!” she said.

Caroline Grace Cassidy – The Other Side of Beautiful (Out Now)

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
If you had the energy to stay up reading all night you can get up for school this morning my girl!

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
Their ability to hide knobs of butter in your food

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
One year I brought her to Paris, we ate rich food and drank fine wine on the warm Champs Elysees. We took in an intimate Paul McCartney concert that glorious evening and then we headed back to The Ritz, climbed into our luxury beds, ordered room service supper and watched Reeling In The Years on satellite TV. Oh sorry …thats what I’d like to do for her one day! For now a card and kiss and some flowers!x

Siobhain Bunni – Dark Mirrors (Out Now in paperback)

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
My mum has a few great sayings: some are suitable to print, others not so! She always says “as my Nana always said:
You’d be hard up for fruit when you tackle an onion
and then theres…She’s all fur coat and no knickers !

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
Yep. The ability to drink copious amounts of tea certainly makes Irish mums unique and the need to pee for hours after!

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
When I was younger, still in National School, i tore a page out of my sums copy and coloured in every square in different colours and I used it to wrap a bar of Tiffin, which was her favourite.

Helen Moorhouse – Sing Me To Sleep (Coming in paperback in June)

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
Like all Irish Mammies, she had many but the one that keeps popping into my head is what she’d say if you were searching for something that was right in front of your eyes but you were still unable to find it. “If it was a dog it’d ate you”, she used to say – it could be used either in frustration or in a smug ‘I know something you don’t’ sort of way and really used to irritate me! If, however, you were stuck at something – homework, for example, she’d always tell you to ‘leave it and come back to it later’ – not as catchy, but very wise – it always works.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
The Irish mother is the queen of selecting a particular household device, above all others, as her key tool – the ‘good scissors’ is a common one, – woe betide anyone who so much as waves it in the direction of a piece of paper. My mother had a favoured ‘little knife’ which was like an extension of her hand when it came to chopping, slicing, peeling and testing – when it eventually broke, it was like a piece of her broke with it. There was also the specific porridge saucepan and the egg saucepan.

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
My mother’s day gifts were never what you might call original – flowers, a pair of earrings, some hand cream perhaps. Sadly, my Mam passed away eight years ago so I’d love to be in a position to give her something lovely for Mother’s Day this year – her favourite thing to do was to read so I think I’d present her with a couple of big murder mysteries along with a bag of her favourite Iced Caramels and cup of tea was only at the right temperature if it brought the inside of your mouth out in blisters. I think she’d like that!

Claudia Carroll

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
My mother’s sayings have evolved a bit over the years. When I was a teenager and rolled home in the wee small hours after one Malibu and Coke too many, (it was the eighties. We’d feck all else to drink,) she’d be standing at the top of the stairs, rollers wobbling dangerously and would say, ‘I’ll deal with you in the morning.’ Ouch. Killer line. Meant I’d spend the whole night trashing about in a knot of worry sweat just wanting to get the tongue lashing out of the way, so normal service could be resumed. However now that she’s more like my best friend than my mother, the phrase I associate most with her is, ‘and while you’re on your feet, I’ll have a glass of Sauvingnon Blanc!’

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique
As for what makes my Mum unique? Well, Mum loves two things in life. One is her family and the other is….rock and roll. I remember no one in school believing me when I told them she was off to see the Rolling Stones when they played Slane, back in the eighties. She’s never missed a Bruce Springsteen gig and even pitched up at his last Irish gig, I kid you not, with a broken leg in a wheelchair. Rock on, Mum!

3. What’s the most thoughtful thing you have ever done for your Mother for Mother’s Day?
As for the most thoughtful thing I’ve ever done for her on Mother’s Day? Well the thing is, she hates Mother’s Day with a passion and always says she doesn’t approve of ‘Hallmark holidays.’ So last year, for a special treat, we all chipped in and got her a trip to her favourite place on earth, New York. She had such a ball, I thought we’d never get her home!

Cecelia Ahern

1. What saying did your Mother always use?
“On the other hand…” She never takes my side, always makes me see everybody else’s opinions which is refreshing but annoying when I think I’m right.

2. What makes Irish Mothers unique?
My mom is one of the stereotypical Irish mothers that I hear about and that’s what makes her unique and incredibly special. She is a breath of fresh air.

Competition: Win movie tickets to see ‘The Double’

To celebrate the upcoming release of ‘The Double’ in cinemas on April 4th , directed by Richard Ayoade and starring Jesse Eisenberg and Mia Wasikowska, our friends at Studio Canal have given us 3 pairs of tickets to giveaway to the IFI, Dublin on Monday 31st March at 6:30pm.

To enter, simply answer the question below and complete the entry form!

Hurry! Closing date for entries is 1pm on Friday, 28th March, 2014.

Simon is a timid man, scratching out an isolated existence in an indifferent world. He is overlooked at work, scorned by his mother, and ignored by the woman of his dreams. He feels powerless to change any of these things. The arrival of a new co-worker, James, serves to upset the balance. James is both Simons exact physical double and his opposite – confident, charismatic and good with women. To Simons horror, James slowly starts taking over his life.

Entries are now closed!

Terms and Conditions:
1. The competition is open to all residents of the Island of Ireland aged 18 or over (proof of age may be required) except employees of the Promoter, their families and/or anyone professionally involved or associated with this Competition.
2. No purchase is necessary.
3. The Competition will close at 13:00 GMT on Friday, March 28th, 2014.
4. To enter, you must answer the question and enter the required information into the above form.
5. Only one entry per person.
6. The Promoter will select a winner at random, providing they have adhered to the criteria outlined in the Terms and Conditions and the Promoter’s decision in relation to this selection and all other matters is final.
7. The 3 selected winners will receive two cinema tickets to attend the screening of The Double at the IFI, Dublin on Monday 31st March at 6:30pm.
8. The prize is non-transferable. No cash alternative will be offered.
9. The winner may be required to participate in publicity.
10. The Promoter reserves the right to withdraw or amend this competition for any reason whatsoever.
11. The Promoter and their agents accept no responsibility for difficulties experienced in submitting an entry to this competition nor for any direct or indirect loss suffered by any individual arising from this competition or any involvement therewith.
12. This competition and these terms and conditions are governed by Irish law and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Irish Courts.
13. Entrants are deemed to have accepted these terms and conditions by participating in this competition.
14. The Promoter is Eason & Son Limited.

Divergent Treasure Hunt – WIN Tickets to Divergent!

 Divergent Movie Poster

To celebrate the release of the Divergent movie in Ireland on the 4th April, Eason are holding an exclusive early screening of the movie on the 31st March 2014!

You can WIN tickets to this screening by participating in our Dublin Divergent Treasure Hunt!

Use your intelligence, integrity, daring, humour and  selflessness to solve the clues as you race around Dublin city with your Faction. The Faction with the most correct answers will win tickets to see Divergent in the cinema before it’s released. Bonus prizes can also be won throughout the day.

Places in the hunt are limited, enrol using the form below by Midnight Thursday 27th March. If you are successful, you will be notified by email Friday 28th March. Participants will be randomly selected and allocated a Faction. Please ensure you are available to participate in the hunt from 12-2pm on Saturday 29th March.

Complete the form below to enroll, or email your details to feedback@easons.com. 

Entries are now closed!

Terms and Conditions

  1. Enrollment is open to all residents of the Island of Ireland aged 16 or over (proof of age may be required) except employees of the Promoter, their families and/or anyone professionally involved or associated with this Competition.
  2. No purchase is necessary.
  3. Enrollment will close at 23:59 GMT on Thursday, March 27th, 2014.
  4. To Participate in the Treasure Hunt, you must first enrol using the form above. Participants will be selected from the applications. Enrolling does not guarantee you a place in the Treasure Hunt.
  5. Only one enrolment per person.
  6. Successful participants will be notified by email and will be advised with further details regarding the treasure hunt.
  7. No cash alternative will be offered for any prizes awarded as part of this promotion.
  8. The grand prize for participating in the Treasure Hunt are tickets to see an advance screening of Divergent in Dublin on the 31st March 2014.
  9. Participants may be required to participate in publicity.
  10. The Promoter reserves the right to withdraw or amend this competition for any reason whatsoever.
  11. The Promoter and their agents accept no responsibility for difficulties experienced in submitting an entry to this competition nor for any direct or indirect loss suffered by any individual arising from this competition or any involvement therewith.
  12. This competition and these terms and conditions are governed by Irish law and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Irish Courts.
  13. Entrants are deemed to have accepted these terms and conditions by participating in this competition.
  14. The Promoter is Eason & Son Limited.

Spelling Bee Update – Clare and Limerick

Eason Spelling Bee with Tubridy 2014

The Spelling Bee travelled to the west again this week with the first of our Munster county finals taking place in Clare and Limerick. For full updates on each of the events please read the following:

Clare Spelling Bee
Scoil na Maighdine Mhuire, Newmarket On Fergus hosted the Clare spelling bee final where 26 super spellers took part on the day. After some exceptional spelling from our final three competitors Jack Feeney from Inch National School was declared the Clare champion and will now go on to represent the county in the Munster Final in June.

Champion Jack Feeney with Keith Griffin & Sarah McCarthy from Eason Ennis

Limerick Spelling Bee
Our second Bee of the week took place in Limerick where a huge welcome was extended to our 26 spellers by our county host JFK Memorial School. Our enthusiastic spellers were very impressive with Kieran Richardson from the host school JFK Memorial declared champion on the day. Kieran will represent Limerick in the Munster Final in June.

Limerick Champion Kieran Richardson with Eunan Boylan from Eason Parkway

Eason Spelling Bee App:
Stemming from the popularity of the Eason Spelling Bee in schools, we are delighted to announce the launch of our new Eason Spelling Bee app which will allow both parents and kids to take part in their own spelling bee at home. Developed for 10 to 14 year olds but fun for all ages, this new app will help kids improve their spelling and literacy skills in a fun and enjoyable way. The app emulates the real life spelling bee but in a mobile world. The new Eason Spelling Bee app is available FREE to download for iPhone and iPad from the iTunes store or by going to www.easons.com/apps

The locations and dates of the upcoming County Finals can be found here. If you have any questions on your county bee or how to run the spelling bee in your own school, then please contact the Eason Spelling Bee team at spellingbee@easons.com

March

Date Time County Location
Wed 26th 11am Kerry Scoil Eoin, Balloonagh, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Thu 27th 11am Cork Rochestown Park Hotel, Rochestown, Cork City

April

Date Time County Location
Tue 1st 11am Kilkenny St. Canice’s Co-Ed N.S., Granges Road, Kilkenny
Wed 2nd 11am Tipperary St. John The Baptist B.N.S., Old Road, Cashel, Co. Tipperary
Thu 3rd 11am Waterford Mount Sion Primary School, Barrack Street, Waterford
Wed 9th 11am Carlow Bennekerry N.S. Co. Carlow
Thurs 10th 11am Wexford Rathnure N.S. Co. Wexford
Tues 29th 11am Monaghan Scoil Eanna, Ballybay, Co. Monaghan
Wed 30th 11am Louth Scoil Mhuire na nGael, Bay Estate, Dundalk

May

Date Time County Location
Thu 1st 11am Down St. Colmcille’s P.S., Glebetown Drive, Downpatrick, Co. Down
Tue 13th 11am Tyrone Sacred Heart Primary School, Tattyreagh, Tyrone.
Wed 14th 11am Derry Termoncanice Primary School, Rathbrady Road, Limavady, Co. Derry
Thu 15th 11am Donegal Scoil Mhuire Gan Smal, Sentry Hill, Letterkenny
Tue 20th 11am Armagh St Anthony’s P.S, Tullygally Road, Craigavon, Co. Armagh
Wed 21st 11am Antrim Templepatrick Primary School, 5 Lylehill Road, Templepatrick, Co.Antrim
Tue 27th 11am Cavan Farnahm N.S , Drumelis, Co. Cavan
Wed 28th 11am Fermanagh Enniskillen Integrated Primary School, Drumcoo, Enniskillen

 

 

Hollywood Calling – Young Adult Books at the Movies

Hollywood Calling Young Adult Books in the Movies



I know it probably seems like the only books I read are Dystopian Young Adult novels, and in fairness, this would be quite true. They all come in trilogies (mostly), they’re all epic in scope and a lot of them are coming as major movies from Hollywood. Oh, and I love them. So why not.

In the coming weeks, months, this obsession will go mainstream as the movie of Veronica Roth’s “Divergent” hits our cinemas on April 4th.

As I’ve mentioned before, this is a page turning must read, set in a dystopian setting in a futuristic Chicago and will have you on the edge of your seat. Shailene Woodley is having a bit of a Young Adult Hollywood moment herself (more of that later) and this looks set to easily slot into that ever elusive “Next Big Thing” category.

James Dashner’s “Maze Runner” series, coming as a movie in October is another breath taking read set in a world where teenage boys wake up in a Maze with no recollection of how they got there and what dangers lie in the maze. Already getting huge buzz since the trailer was released, now would be the time to read the books before it all kicks off.

The other phenomenon lurking on the bookshelves and already having a huge fanbase of “Nerdfighters” worldwide are the books of John Green. Known globally, yet still somehow a cult figure … this is all about to change with the release of the movie of “The Fault In Our Stars”. This tragic love story set in a teen cancer support group was one of my favourite books of the past number of years and is only a stepping stone to these brilliant books by a man at the top of his writing game. Issue based, romantic and filled with wit, I implore you to read these books as soon as possible. Yes, start with “The Fault In Our Stars” , but my favourite “Will Grayson, Will Grayson” is just as touching. Oh and yes, Shailene Woodley also stars in this one.

Speaking of Shailene, completing her hat-trick of Young Adult movies based on books to be released this year, “The Spectacular Now” (which also stars the brilliant Miles Teller) is a stunning coming of age story based on Tim Tharp’s beautiful novel. I’ve already seen the movie and it’s a heart breaking, inspiring movie that captures young love and social awkwardness perfectly. I’d urge everyone to both read it and see it.

Despite a poor show at the U.S. box office earlier this year, Richelle Mead’s “Vampire Academy” series sees it’s movie adaptation released here on April 23rd. From the director of “Mean Girls” and the writer of “Heathers” , the calibre is there, it’s just whether audiences wish to connect with the subject matter or are they all vamped out. Either way, the series was a hugely popular one post – Twilight and if it hasn’t been read, is worth a look. Finally, November sees the release of “Hunger Games : Mockingjay – Part 1”. Spilt into 2 parts, this series has been a worldwide success based on the popularity of the movies and like Twilight, has become a benchmark for all future literary adaptations. So before you get the popcorn and sugary drinks ordered, why not step back, take a moment and BEFORE THE MOVIE – READ THAT BOOK !

Spelling Bee Update – Mayo and Galway

Eason Spelling Bee with Tubridy 2014

This week the Spelling Bee travelled to the west with county finals taking place in Mayo and Galway. For full updates on each of the events please read the following.

Mayo Spelling Bee
St. Patrick’s De La Salle B.N.S, Castlebar hosted the Mayo spelling bee final where 25 super spellers took part on the day. After some great spelling, Maja Tkaczyk from Scoil Phadraig, Westport was declared the Mayo champion and will now go on to represent the county in the Connacht Final in June.

Mayo Group of Spellers
  Mayo winner:
Maja Tkaczyk with Eunan Boylan
from Eason Castlebar & Ballina

Galway Spelling Bee
Our second largest Spelling Bee this year took place in Galway on Wednesday. We had 51 spellers for the county Galway spelling bee final which was held in Scoil Einde, Salthill, Galway. Our enthusiastic spellers were very impressive with Aisling Casserly from Leitrim National School, Kylebrack declared champion on the day. Aisling will represent Galway in the Connacht Final in June.

Galway Group of Spellers
  Galway Champion:
Aisling Casserly with
Chris O’ Connor
from Eason Galway

The locations and dates of the upcoming County Finals can be found here and once all are confirmed they will be added here. If you have any questions on your county bee or how to run the spelling bee in your own school, then please contact the Eason Spelling Bee team at spellingbee@easons.com

Date Time County Location
Wed 19th Mar 11am Clare Scoil na Maighdine Mhuire, Ennis Road, Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare
Thu 20th Mar 11am Limerick JFK Memorial School, Ennis Road, Limerick
Wed 26th Mar 11am Kerry Scoil Eoin, Balloonagh, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Thu 27th Mar 11am Cork Rochestown Park Hotel, Cork.
Tues 1st Apr 11 am Kilkenny St. Canice’s Co-Ed N.S., Granges Road, Kilkenny
Wed 2nd Apr 11am Tipperary St. John The Baptist B.N.S., Old Road, Cashel, Co. Tipperary
Thu 3rd Apr 11am Waterford Mount Sion Primary School, Barrack Street, Waterford
Wed 9th Apr 11am Carlow Bennekerry N.S. Co. Carlow
Thu 10th Apr 11am Wexford Rathnure N.S. Rathnure, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.
Tues 29th Apr 11am Monaghan Scoil Eanna, Ballybay, Co. Monaghan
Wed 30th Apr 11am Louth Scoil Mhuire na nGael, Bay Estate, Dundalk
Thu 1st May 11am Down St. Colmcille’s P.S., Glebetown Drive, Downpatrick
Tue 13th May 11am Tyrone Sacred Heart Primary School, Tattyreagh, Tyrone.
Wed 14th May 11am Derry Termoncanice Primary School, Rathbrady Road, Limavady, Co. Derry
Thu 15th May 11am Donegal Scoil Mhuire Gan Smal, Sentry Hill, Letterkenny
Tue 20th May 11am Armagh St Anthony’s P.S, Tullygally Road, Craigavon, Co. Armagh
Wed 21st May 11am Antrim TBC
Tue 27th May 11am Cavan Farnahm N.S , Drumelis, Co. Cavan
Wed 28th May 11am Fermanagh Enniskillen Integrated Primary School, Drumcoo, Enniskillen

 

 

Guest Article: The Friday Tree by Sophia Hillan

Former Associate Director of Queen’s University Belfast Institute of Irish Studies, Sophia Hillan returned to her first love, writing fiction, in 1999, when she was runner-up in the Royal Society of Literature’s first VS Pritchett Memorial Prize. Her short story “The Cocktail Hour” was subsequently published in David Marcus’s first Faber Book of Best New Irish Short Stories, and other short story, “Roses”, was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2007. In 2011 she received huge praise for May, Lou and Cass, the untold true story of Jane Austen’s nieces in Ireland. In this guest blog post Sophia talks about her new book The Friday Tree.

The Friday Tree took shape over a number of years. I always felt, even in childhood that there was something quite lovely and mysterious about the seven trees in the field behind our house, which was indeed at the edge of the city, looking up to the Black Mountain. I also did really think they were the days of the week, and that they had the shapes of the days as I understood them. Brigid’s character was taken from a composite of many people: my sister, my cousins, my daughter and nieces and, yes, here and there a little of myself. The character of Francis is very largely based on that of my eldest brother, who was just as kind, clever and patient a brother as Francis — even though he had not one but four younger siblings making demands upon him. He was our peacemaker and our conscience; but because he was witty and lighthearted, no-one took it amiss that he kept us in order, as Francis does with Brigid.

I spent some years as a young adult living and working in Dublin. With the detachment that living away brings, I grew increasingly aware of something subconsciously absorbed, a sense that the trouble we had experienced in the North in the late 1960s had not, as newspapers and television seemed to be telling us, suddenly burst upon an unsuspecting, peaceful and law-abiding society. The 1950s in the North was quiet only on the surface. A visit to Belfast’s excellent Newspaper Library confirmed that there was a prolonged bombing campaign by the IRA in the mid 1950s, starting in England and then moving to the North; while at the same time, long before the well-known Garvaghy Road incidents, 12,000 Orangemen repeatedly insisted on their right to walk, on what was at the time described as a “hot Twelfth”, through a largely nationalist area in County Down. Everything was in place, ready to erupt, long before 1968.

I grew conscious conscious that an assumption was being made that nothing had been wrong before 1968, which I knew to be false. Also, it seemed to be assumed in the media that there was no middle ground, that all Catholics were dispossessed, angry, languishing in poverty, and waiting for a chance to overthrow the state. This picture is neat but inaccurate. There were also in the 1950s and 1960s Republican Protestants, like the fictional Cornelius Todd; and, crucially, there were also young idealists, Catholics and Protestants alike who, hoping that intelligence and moderation would prevail, quietly worked towards a peaceful solution to the many inequalities of a flawed system. In his young adulthood, my brother, the model for Francis, was one such.

In writing the book, I wanted to recreate what was and is a world loved and lost and, above all, by telling what I hope is a good story, to make the point that life, in the North, was in many ways not so very different from life in the rest of Ireland, which makes what happened, to me, even sadder and more of a waste. These are the issues which most often come up in my own conversations about contemporary Irish novels, either with friends, at literary events or lectures and, perhaps most of all, in book clubs, where I find so much lively debate and thoughtful, enjoyable discussion takes place.

Guest Article: Writing Unravelling Oliver by Liz Nugent

Liz Nugent has worked in Irish film, theatre and television for most of her adult life. She is an award-winning writer of radio and television drama and has written short stories for children and adults. In this guest blog post Liz talks about writing her first novel Unravelling Oliver.

Unravelling Oliver by Liz NugentI think the key to writing is probably reading. I am one of those stereotypical writers who spent a lot of time in hospital as a child, and, as anyone who has stayed in hospital for any length of time will tell you, reading is really the only way to pass the time. If I ever go to prison, I will make sure to ask the judge to send me to one with a good library.

I like books that are very well written, but for me, the story is just as important. It is possible to write beautifully and have nothing happen. I analysed the kind of stories that appealed to me. The books I liked to read were always about damaged or deeply flawed men. The Brontes’ Heathcliff and Mr Rochester, Sebastian Faulks’ Engleby and John Banville’s Freddie Montgomery from The Book of Evidence were all characters that fascinated me, so I always thought that if I ever wrote a book, I would have an anti-hero rather than a leading man.

For some reason, it never crossed my mind to write a woman. I don’t know why that is but often, when I dream, I am a man in the dream and it seems perfectly natural. My husband is highly amused by this, but I still won’t mow the lawn.

I began to write from Oliver’s point of view, but quickly realised that if you are nasty, you won’t know that you are nasty. You will have a way of justifying your bad behaviour, you will learn fast to manipulate people and situations. You will end up living a lie and you cannot ever reveal your true feelings because society will not accept them. I think perhaps that this secrecy further warps the personality to such an extent that your humanity is eroded.

Writing from Oliver’s p.o.v. was quite liberating. I made him say and do the most awful, despicable things I could imagine. Fortunately, my imagination stops short of completely debaucherous so I hope it’s a safe read, even for the faint-hearted. And it is also funny at times.

I found that I needed to know how others perceived Oliver, so I began to write from the point of view of his neighbour, his gay admirer, his former employer, an old school mate and the actress with whom he is having an affair. I needed to explore how they saw Oliver and how they were fooled by him.

The plot, which has many twists and turns, evolved organically from the characters. My training as a tv writer made me think carefully about hooking the reader in and making the story as compulsive as possible to keep them reading, so that every chapter ends with a hint or a teaser of what may come. I also tried to make it as visual as possible without describing every small detail. Hopefully the reader will have a vivid picture in their head of the people and places referenced in the novel.

I am very pleased and grateful that Unravelling Oliver has been chosen for the Easons Bookbind series. Already, Oliver has proven to be a controversial character among early readers. Some people find him wholly objectionable while others have a certain sympathy for him because of his background and early abandonment. I’m really looking forward to hearing reader’s thoughts and opinions but am secretly dreading the grilling I’m going to get from my own highly critical book club!

Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2014: Longlist Announced

Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction 2014The judges of the 2014 Women’s Prize for Fiction have once again chosen the eve of International Women’s Day to announce the nominees for this much sought after title. Previously known as the Orange prize, the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction is awarded for the best novel of the year written by a woman of any nationality in the English language. The judging panel (including journalist Caitlin Moran, author Denise Mina and historian Mary Beard) read an incredible 158 books before deciding to put these 20 titles forward and there is no denying that they made some fantastic selections, featuring writing of the highest quality from both well-established writers and debut authors.


The Undertaking by Audrey Magee
Among the debuts nominated is Irish author Audrey Magee’s fantastic novel The Undertaking, which tells the story of a German soldier who marries a woman he has never met, merely to secure ‘honeymoon’ leave for him and a pension for her. When they meet, both are pleasantly surprised by the mutual attraction between them but little do they know that both of their lives will be marred by the decisions she makes after he returns to the front. The book has been receiving a lot of well-deserved recognition and media coverage of late, and this nomination can only serve to further that popularity.

Eimear McBride’s A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing is another debut from an Irish author, one that has already won McBride the 2013 Goldsmiths Prize. In painstaking detail, she tells the story of a young woman’s relationship with her brother and his childhood brain tumour. Though often harrowing, this is an incredibly moving book and well worth a look.

Hannah Kent’s Burial Rites is a staff favourite here in Eason HQ. It is an extraordinary tale set in rural Iceland in the 1800s, based on the true story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir who was sentenced to death for murder and exiled to a local family’s farm to await her fate. This narrative of the final days of the last woman to be executed in Iceland is both tragic and beautiful.


The Goldfinch by Donna tart
Another Eason’s favourite is Donna Tartt whose nomination for The Goldfinch will come as no surprise to many people. This was certainly one of the most talked about novels of 2013 and well worth the eleven year wait. It tells the story of Theo Decker, a young boy whose mother dies when the art museum they’re visiting is hit by a terrorist attack. He becomes obsessed by the only thing that reminds him of her, a small painting of a goldfinch – a piece of art that will bring him both great happiness and great danger.

 


The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton
We couldn’t go without mentioning Man Booker Prize winner Eleanor Catton who has secured yet another award nomination for her weighty tome, The Luminaries. Don’t be put off by the size of this one, it is a genuinely accomplished piece of work and a gripping read.

Finally, previous winner Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is nominated for her story of race and love across continents, Americanah. Adichie won in 2007 for the remarkable Half a Yellow Sun, which continues to be a bestseller today. Can she claim this coveted prize again?

The judges now have the difficult task of whittling the 20 books down to a shortlist of six, before the overall winner is announced on 4th June.

The other nominees are:

All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld
Almost English by Charlotte Mendelson
Eleven Days by Lea Carpenter
Maddaddam by Margaret Atwood
Reasons She Goes to the Woods by Deborah Kay Davies
Still Life With Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen
The Bear by Claire Cameron
The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout
The Dogs of Littlefield by Suzanne Berne
The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner
The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri
The Shadow of the Crescent Moon by Fatima Bhutto
The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert
The Strangler Vine by M.J. Carter

For more information, visit Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.

Eason Ladybird ‘Mad About…’ Book Giveaway Offer

Ladybird Books Giveaway

From Sat 8th March, Eason in association with the Irish Independent are running a fabulous 12 week Ladybird ‘Mad About’ Books Giveaway Offer.

Each Saturday for 12 weeks, every customer who purchases the Irish Independent in any Eason Republic of Ireland store will receive a FREE copy of the weekly Ladybird ‘Mad About…’ Book.

Customers who do not purchase the Irish Independent, but present the Voucher from Page 2 of the Saturday Irish Independent, are also eligible to receive this offer*.

12 Weekly Ladybird ‘Mad About…’ Giveaway Titles

 Sat 8th March 2014  Dinosaurs
 Sat 15th March 2014  Sharks
 Sat 22nd March 2014  Deadly Creatures
 Sat 29th March 2014  Whales & Dolphins
 Sat 5th April 2014  Bugs
 Sat 12th April 2014  Ponies
 Sat 19th April 2014  Space
 Sat 26th April 2014  Costumes & Fashion
 Sat  3rd May 2014  Castle & Knights
 Sat 10th May 2014  Egyptians
 Sat 17th May 2014  Pirates
 Sat 24th May 2014  Ballet

*Terms & Conditions:
Eason Ladybird ‘Mad About…’ Book Giveaway Offer: Offer applies to Eason Republic of Ireland stores only, and is subject to purchase of the Saturday Edition of the Irish Independent or the presentation of a voucher from Page 2 of the Publication at the till. One FREE book per transaction only.

 

Spelling Bee Update: Wicklow, Meath and Westmeath

Eason Spelling Bee with Tubridy 2014

This week Spelling Bee county finals were held in Wicklow, Meath and Westmeath. For full updates on each of the events please read the following.

Wicklow Spelling Bee
Kilcoole Primary School, Wicklow was the venue for the first Spelling Bee of the week. 17 super spellers took part in the county Wicklow final. After some excellent spelling, Eimear Dowling from Scoil Náisiúnta Phádraig Naofa, Avoca was declared the Wicklow champion and will now go on to represent the county in the Leinster Final in June.

Wicklow Group of spellers
Winner: Eimear Dowling with William Fitzpatrick from Eason Arklow

Meath Spelling Bee
We had a large crowd of spellers for the Meath spelling bee final which was held in St. Paul’s National School, Ratoath. Our 38 enthusiastic spellers were very impressive with Daniel McEntee from Whitecross National School, Julianstown the champion on the day. Daniel will represent Meath in the Leinster Final in June.

 Meath Group of spellers
Winner: Daniel McEntee with Kathryn Fanning, Manager Eason Ashbourne

Westmeath Spelling Bee
The Westmeath competition which was the final Bee of the week took place in St. Etchen’s National School, Kinnegad. 19 enthusiastic spellers took part on the day and Finn Brady from Gaeilscoil an Choillín was declared the Westmeath Spelling Bee champion. Finn will now represent the county in the Leinster Final in June.

Westmeath Group of spellers
Westmeath Spelling Bee Champion: Finn Brady

The locations and dates of the upcoming County Finals can be found here and once all are confirmed they will be added here. If you have any questions on your county bee or how to run the spelling bee in your own school, then please contact the Eason Spelling Bee team at spellingbee@easons.com.

Date Time County Location
Tue 11th Mar 11am Mayo St. Patrick’s De La Salle, Chapel Street, Castlebar,.
Wed 12th Mar 11am Galway Scoil Einde, Dr Mannix Road, Salthill
Wed 19th Mar 11am Clare Scoil na Maighdine Mhuire, Ennis Road, Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare
Thu 20th Mar 11am Limerick JFK Memorial School, Ennis Road, Limerick
Wed 26th Mar 11am Kerry Scoil Eoin, Balloonagh, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Thu 27th Mar 11am Cork Rochestown Park Hotel, Cork.
Tues 1st Apr 11 am Kilkenny St. Canice’s Co-Ed N.S., Granges Road, Kilkenny
Wed 2nd Apr 11am Tipperary St. John The Baptist B.N.S., Old Road, Cashel, Co. Tipperary
Thu 3rd Apr 11am Waterford Mount Sion Primary School, Barrack Street, Waterford
Wed 9th Apr 11am Carlow Bennekerry N.S. Co. Carlow
Thu 10th Apr 11am Wexford Rathnure N.S. Rathnure, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.
Tues 29th Apr 11am Monaghan Scoil Eanna, Ballybay, Co. Monaghan
Wed 30th Apr 11am Louth Scoil Mhuire na nGael, Bay Estate, Dundalk
Thu 1st May 11am Down St. Colmcille’s P.S., Glebetown Drive, Downpatrick
Tue 13th May 11am Tyrone Sacred Heart Primary School, Tattyreagh, Tyrone.
Wed 14th May 11am Derry Termoncanice Primary School, Rathbrady Road, Limavady, Co. Derry
Thu 15th May 11am Donegal Scoil Mhuire Gan Smal, Sentry Hill, Letterkenny
Tue 20th May 11am Armagh St Anthony’s P.S, Tullygally Road, Craigavon, Co. Armagh
Wed 21st May 11am Antrim TBC
Tue 27th May 11am Cavan Farnahm N.S , Drumelis, Co. Cavan
Wed 28th May 11am Fermanagh Enniskillen Integrated Primary School, Drumcoo, Enniskillen

 

 

Spelling Bee Update – Laois and Dublin

Spelling Bee county finals took place in Laois and Dublin this week. For full updates on each of the events please read the following:

Laois Spelling Bee
St Paul’s N.S. in Portlaoise were the host school for the Laois spelling bee final where 13 super spellers took part on the day. After some great spelling, Jim Kirby from Scoil Tichearnach Naofa, Cullohill was declared the Laois champion and will now go on to represent the county in the Leinster Final in June.

 Laois Group of spellers Laois County Champion: Jim Kirby
from Scoil Tichearnach Naofa
Laois Spelling Bee Laois Spelling Bee Winner

Dublin Spelling Bee
Our largest Spelling Bee to date took place in Dublin on Thursday. We had 92 spellers for the county Dublin spelling bee final which was held in The Pavillion at the Red Cow Hotel. Our enthusiastic spellers were excellent with Billy Lawlor from St. Oliver Plunkett N.S. Malahide declared champion on the day. Billy will represent Dublin in the Leinster Final in June.

Dublin Group of spellers Dublin Champion: Billy Lawlor with
Sue Lynch manager at Eason Blanchardstown

The locations and dates of the upcoming County Finals can be found here and once all are confirmed they will be added here. If you have any questions on your county bee or how to run the spelling bee in your own school, then please contact the Eason Spelling Bee team at spellingbee@easons.com.

Date Time County Location
Tue 25th Feb 11am Laois St. Paul’s N.S., Borris Road, Portlaoise, Co. Laois
Thu 27th Feb 11am Dublin The Pavilion, Red Cow Hotel, Naas Road, Dublin 22
Tue 4th Mar 11am Wicklow Kilcoole Primary School, Kilcoole, Co. Wicklow
Wed 5th Mar 11am Meath St. Paul’s N.S., Ratoath, Co. Meath
Thu 6th Mar 11am Westmeath St. Etchen’s N.S., Kinnegad, Co. Westmeath
Tue 11th Mar 11am Mayo St. Patrick’s De La Salle, Chapel Street, Castlebar,.
Wed 12th Mar 11am Galway Scoil Einde, Dr Mannix Road, Salthill
Wed 19th Mar 11am Clare Scoil na Maighdine Mhuire, Ennis Road, Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare
Thu 20th Mar 11am Limerick JFK Memorial School, Ennis Road, Limerick
Wed 26th Mar 11am Kerry Scoil Eoin, Balloonagh, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Thu 27th Mar 11am Cork Rochestown Park Hotel, Cork.
Tues 1st Apr 11 am Kilkenny St. Canice’s Co-Ed N.S., Granges Road, Kilkenny
Wed 2nd Apr 11am Tipperary St. John The Baptist B.N.S., Old Road, Cashel, Co. Tipperary
Thu 3rd Apr 11am Waterford Mount Sion Primary School, Barrack Street, Waterford
Wed 9th Apr 11am Carlow Bennekerry N.S. Co. Carlow
Thu 10th Apr 11am Wexford Rathnure N.S. Rathnure, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.
Tues 29th Apr 11am Monaghan Scoil Eanna, Ballybay, Co. Monaghan
Wed 30th Apr 11am Louth Scoil Mhuire na nGael, Bay Estate, Dundalk
Thu 1st May 11am Down St. Colmcille’s P.S., Glebetown Drive, Downpatrick
Tue 13th May 11am Tyrone Sacred Heart Primary School, Tattyreagh, Tyrone.
Wed 14th May 11am Derry Termoncanice Primary School, Rathbrady Road, Limavady, Co. Derry
Thu 15th May 11am Donegal Scoil Mhuire Gan Smal, Sentry Hill, Letterkenny
Tue 20th May 11am Armagh St Anthony’s P.S, Tullygally Road, Craigavon, Co. Armagh
Wed 21st May 11am Antrim TBC
Tue 27th May 11am Cavan Farnahm N.S , Drumelis, Co. Cavan
Wed 28th May 11am Fermanagh Enniskillen Integrated Primary School, Drumcoo, Enniskillen

 

 

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